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Sony LDP-2000 & Sony LDP-2000P

Sony LDP-2000 rack-mount case containing a Sony VIW-3020 Computer control unit

The archive site has a copy of the Operation Manual for the LDP-2000. Please see the manuals page.  

Thanks to Scott Rinehart for the above picture.

Videodisc format: Laservision 
Videodisc size: 8" and 12" 
Pick-up method: Laser beam (reflective) 
Laser type: Semiconductor laser diode 
Laser output: .7 mW max. 
Maximum playing time: 
CAV: 30 min/side 
CLV: 60 min/side 
Spindle revolution: 
CAV: 1800 RPM 
CLV: 1800 to 600 RPM 
Access time: 
CAV: 1.5 sec. max. 
CLV: 36.0 sec. max 
VIDEO SECTION 
Signal: EIA standard, NTSC color 
External inputs: 
Ext. Sync (BNC), 4 V +/- 1.0 V p-p, 75 ohm unbalanced 
Outputs: 
Video Out (BNC) - 1.0 V p-p, 75 ohm unbalanced, negative polarity sync 
VHF Out (F-type) - channel 3 or 4 selectable, 75 ohm unbalanced 
Resolution: 360 lines 
Signal-to-noise: 42 dB 

AUDIO SECTION 
Outputs: 0 dBV (1kHz, 100% modulation, 47K ohms terminated), unbalanced 
Headphone: 8 ohm, -21 dB max. 
Signal-to-noise ratio: 
CX On: 67 dB 
CX Off: 55 dB 
Frequency response: 20 Hz to 20 Khz +/-2dB 

EXTERNAL COMPUTER INTERFACE 
Interface type: RS-232C (female, 25-pin, D-shell connector) 
Baud rates: 1200, 2400, 4800, and 9600 selectable 

OPERATING ENVIRONMENT 
Operating temperature: 
5 to 35 degrees C 
41 to 95 degrees F 
Operating humidity: 25% to 80% non-condensing 
Storage temperature: 
-20 to 60 degrees C 
-4 to 140 degrees F 

GENERAL 
Power requirements: 
120V AC, 60 Hz 
AC outlet: Unswitched, max. 300W 
Power consumption: 75 W max. 
Dimensions (WxHxD): 
Approx. 424 x 132 x 448 mm 
16 3/4" x 5 1/4" x 19 1/4" 
Weight: 
13.4 kg. 
29 lbs., 9 oz.

This is an NTSC laser disc player that was not used in any laser disc games from the factory.  This player can be used as a direct replacement for any of the games that are listed in the LDP-1450 section, except Dragon's Lair II.  (if you want to use this player in a Dragon's Lair II, check here.)  Using the Laser Ace Conversion Card, this player can be used in many other laser disc games.  For more information on which games it will work with, see the Laser Ace home page.

The LD player must be set to 9600 baud rate for proper communication with the PCB.  The dip switch settings for the Sony LDP-2000 are:  1-up, 2-up, 3-up, 4-down.  For info on the Command Set, check the Sony Command Set page.

The laserdisc player can be controlled mainly by an external computer with an RS-232C interface. The player are designed to play Analogue soundtrack Laservision discs only and are not compatible with NTSC or PAL Laserdiscs and CD Videos with digital PCM soundtracks. If in doubt look out for discs with a CX noise reduction logo as this is only used on analogue soundtracks.

In addition to computer control the LDP-2000 (and probably others in the series) can be controlled with the optional RM-2001 remote control unit.

The factory preset data format is as follows :

  • Asynchronous mode
  • 8 bits character length
  • 1200 bps baud rate (adjustable via selector on back of unit between 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 bps)
  • No parity check
  • Least significant bit first (1 bit stop bit)
Due to my lack of programming skills I simply created batch files which sent the requisite character to the serial port.
For example:    play.bat ==>    echo ":"  >com2
In the table below you will find the majority of the command codes for basic operation of a Lasermax machine.

 
COMMAND CHARACTER
Chapter Inquiry v
Chapter Mode i
Clear All V
Resume the mode prior to Still a
CX Noise Reduction On n
CX Noise Reduction Off o
Open the disc compartment *
Fast Forward ;
Frame Advance +
Frame Mode U
Frame Reverse ,
Forward Scan >
Forward Skip  -
Forward Slow <
Variable forward play =
Index On P
Index Off Q
Memorize the current location Z
Locate the memorized location [
Set mark position s
Menu B
Start-up spindle motor b
Stop spindle motor c
Audio mute on $
Audio Mute off %
Play :
Repeat D
Rewind K
Reverse Play J
Scan in reverse N
Reverse skip .
Slow reverse play L
Variable reverse play M
Still O
Stop ?